Is your supercomputer stumped? There may be a quantum solution

Some math problems are so complicated that they can bog down even the world's most powerful supercomputers. But a wild new frontier in computing that applies the rules of the quantum realm offers a different approach.

Rediscovering Saskatchewan's scientific heritage

Gathered together from every corner of the University of Saskatchewan (USask) Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, the unique collection of scientific artifacts fills two rooms in the Physics Building.

Army project develops agile scouting robots

In a research project for the U.S. Army, researchers at the University of California, Berkeley developed an agile robot, called Salto that looks like a Star Wars Imperial walker in miniature and may be able to aid in scouting ...

Move over, silicon switches: There's a new way to compute

Logic and memory devices, such as the hard drives in computers, now use nanomagnetic mechanisms to store and manipulate information. Unlike silicon transistors, which have fundamental efficiency limitations, they require ...

Quantum speed limit may put brakes on quantum computers

Over the past five decades, standard computer processors have gotten increasingly faster. In recent years, however, the limits to that technology have become clear: Chip components can only get so small, and be packed only ...

New electron microscope sees more than an image

The electron microscope, a powerful tool for science, just became even more powerful, with an improvement developed by Cornell physicists. Their electron microscope pixel array detector (EMPAD) yields not just an image, but ...

Mathematicians bring ocean to life for Disney's 'Moana'

UCLA mathematics professor Joseph Teran, a Walt Disney consultant on animated movies since 2007, is under no illusion that artists want lengthy mathematics lessons, but many of them realize that the success of animated movies ...

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