Related topics: space · nasa · launch vehicle

Mathematical model reveals behavior of cellular enzymes

Everything a cell does, from dividing in two to migrating to a different part of the body, is controlled by enzymes that chemically modify other proteins in the cell. Researchers at Princeton University have devised a new ...

Sea lions could point the way to monitor riverbed erosion

A recent research study conducted by City, University of London's Professor Christoph Bruecker and his team, has revealed a novel correlation in the way sealions and rats use their whiskers, which paves the way for the online-monitoring ...

Scientists propose new properties in hollow multishell structure

The Chinese puzzle ball is an ornate decorative artwork consisting of several concentric shells that move independently of each other. In the recent decade, Chinese scientists provided a universal method for the fabrication ...

Better protection for critical pipelines during land movement

Researchers at the University of Technology Sydney (UTS) have developed a cost-effective and practical method to protect pipelines and keep them operating during significant fault rupture incidents and large ground movements.

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Engine

An engine is a mechanical device that produces some form of output from a given input. An engine whose purpose is to produce kinetic energy output from a fuel source is called a prime mover; alternatively, a motor is a device which produces kinetic energy from other forms of energy (such as electricity, a flow of hydraulic fluid or compressed air). A motor car (automobile) has a starter motor and motors to drive pumps (fuel, power steering, etc) – but the power plant that propels the car is called an engine. The term 'motor' was originally used to distinguish the new internal combustion engine -powered vehicles from earlier vehicles powered by a steam engine (as in steam roller and motor roller).

Military engines included siege engines, large catapults, trebuchets and battering rams.

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