Bioceramics power the mantis shrimp's famous punch

Researchers in Singapore can now explain what gives the mantis shrimp, a marine crustacean that hunts by battering its prey with its club-like appendages, the most powerful punch in the animal kingdom. In a paper publishing ...

Little ANTs: Researchers build the world's tiniest engine

Researchers have developed the world's tiniest engine - just a few billionths of a metre in size - which uses light to power itself. The nanoscale engine, developed by researchers at the University of Cambridge, could form ...

Researcher studies how animals puncture things

If shooting arrows from a crossbow into cubes of ballistics gelatin doesn't sound like biological science to you, you've got a lot to learn from University of Illinois animal biology professor Philip Anderson, who did just ...

The contrarian dance of DNA

Have a close-up look at DNA; you'll see it wiggles in the oddest way. Put more scientifically, a piece of DNA's movements are often counterintuitive to those of objects in our everyday grasp. Take a rod of rubber, for example. ...

Understanding the iliotibial band

For many people, it's the source of a nagging—and painful—injury, but for Carolyn Eng, the IT band is an intriguing mystery, one she may be close to solving.

The science behind Kyrgios' serve

A big serve proved its value as part of Australian wild card Nick Kyrgios' game yesterday, with 37 aces in his fourth round Wimbledon victory over world number one Rafael Nadal.

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