Tetrahedra may explain water's uniqueness

Researchers at the Institute of Industrial Science at the University of Tokyo sifted through experimental data to probe the possibility that supercooled water has a liquid-to-liquid phase transition between disordered and ...

Stay-at-home orders cut noise exposure nearly in half

People's exposure to environmental noise dropped nearly in half during the early months of the coronavirus pandemic, according to University of Michigan researchers who analyzed data from the Apple Hearing Study.

Seismic data yields deeper quake knowledge

By examining data from large earthquakes, KAUST researchers have linked their magnitude, and the extent to which they cause aftershocks, to new depths in the Earth's crust: these are depths at which it was previously thought ...

Using math to examine the sex differences in dinosaurs

Male lions typically have manes. Male peacocks have six-foot-long tail feathers. Female eagles and hawks can be about 30% bigger than males. But if you only had these animals' fossils to go off of, it would be hard to confidently ...

'Insect apocalypse' may not be happening in US

Scientists have been warning about an 'insect apocalypse' in recent years, noting sharp declines in specific areas—particularly in Europe. A new study shows these warnings may have been exaggerated and are not representative ...

Mapping the early universe with NASA's Webb Telescope

Astronomers and engineers have designed telescopes, in part, to be "time travelers." The farther away an object is, the longer its light takes to reach Earth. Peering back in time is one reason why NASA's upcoming James Webb ...

Earth's species have more in common than previously believed

The Earth hosts an abundance of life forms—from well-known animals and plants to small, more hardy life forms such as archaea, viruses and bacteria. These life forms are fundamentally different all the way down to the cell ...

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