UV lights on power lines may help save Sandhill cranes

Crane species are declining around the world, and lethal collisions with power lines are an ongoing threat to many crane populations. Current techniques for marking power lines and making them more visible to cranes aren't ...

Cranes here to stay, new model predicts

The UK's tallest bird – the common crane – is here to stay and we could have as many as 275 breeding pairs within 50 years, according to the latest population model from scientists at the University of Exeter, WWT and ...

Strategic strikes by mantis shrimp smash shells selectively

For a tiny crustacean, Caribbean rock mantis shrimp (Neogonodactylus bredini) pack a ferocious punch. Bludgeoning the shells of snails and other crustaceans to gain access to the tasty snail within, mantis shrimp flick their ...

How to improve habitat conservation for migrating cranes

Every year, North America's critically endangered Whooping Cranes travel back and forth along a 4,000-kilometer corridor linking their nesting grounds in Canada and their winter home in Texas. Habitat in their path through ...

How reliable are traditional wildlife surveys?

To effectively manage a wildlife species, one of the most basic things you need to know is how many of them are out there. However, it's almost never feasible to count every single individual—so how do the results of wildlife ...

Internet data could boost conservation

Businesses routinely use internet data to learn about customers and increase profits - and similar techniques could be used to boost conservation.

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