Cover crops can lower yields, according to new study

The promise for American agriculture is tantalizing: healthier soil, more carbon kept in the ground, less fertilizer runoff, and less need for chemicals. The reality of planting cover crops during the off-season—a much-touted ...

Building resilient farmlands in the Midwest

In the Midwest, climate change has battered states with flooding, drought and erosion. Extreme weather events have made for unpredictable crop yields.

Study shows a single cover crop can outperform mixtures

Cover crops can be a valuable tool for weed suppression—successfully competing with weeds for light, water, nutrients and space. As a result, new cover crop seed mixes are growing in popularity as a sustainable option for ...

Researchers study impacts of winter grazing

Winter grazing is part of what is called an integrated crop-livestock system. It is a process where livestock, such as cattle or goats, are allowed to graze a crop field during the winter. It is more common in climates with ...

Why interseeding might be the boost cover crops need

American farmers harvest nearly five times more corn than wheat. But this productive, useful crop requires fertilizer to reach its maximum potential, and is often not able to take up all the fertilizer it's given. Excess ...

How cover crops can protect the Chesapeake Bay

The Chesapeake Bay once produced tens of millions of bushels of oysters a year. Today, the oyster harvest is below one percent of these historic highs. What happened?

Capturing carbon with crops, trees and bioenergy

An integrated approach to land management practices in the U.S. can reduce carbon dioxide in the atmosphere far more than earlier estimates based on separate approaches, Michigan State University researchers say. Their research ...

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