Related topics: climate change · coral reefs · coral

Back-to-back heatwaves kill more than two-thirds of coral

By comparing reefs before and after two extreme heatwaves only 12 months apart, a collaborative team of researchers including scientists from Bangor's School of Ocean Sciences found that living hard corals in the central ...

Coral reefs shifting away from equator

Coral reefs are retreating from equatorial waters and establishing new reefs in more temperate regions, according to new research in the journal Marine Ecology Progress Series. The researchers found that the number of young ...

Corals in Singapore likely to survive sea-level rise

Global sea levels are expected to rise by at least half a metre by the year 2100 due to climate change. The projected rise can affect important environmental factors such as habitat suitability and availability of light, ...

Harvesters of light

They fan out into lily-pad-shaped disks, branch haphazardly like the antlers of deer, and hold fast to the sea floor in squat little spheres. Corals come in many shapes and sizes—and this diversity in form is driven by ...

Conservation goals compete at the expense of biodiversity

With an ever-growing list of threats facing biodiversity on multiple scales, conservationists struggle to determine which to address. A common reaction is to prioritize their efforts on threats to individual species or management ...

New study finds distinct microbes living next to corals

Symbiotic algae living inside corals provide those animals with their vibrant color, as well as many of the nutrients they need to survive. That algae, and other microbes within the bodies of corals, have been extensively ...

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