Coronavirus having little impact on climate: UN agency

Though factories have shut, planes have been grounded and cars left in the garage, the coronavirus pandemic is having very little impact on climate change, the World Meteorological Organization said Wednesday.

COVID-19: Economic slowdown doesn't stop climate change

Efforts to control the coronavirus pandemic have reduced economic activity and led to localized improvements in air quality. But it is too early to assess the implications for concentrations of greenhouse gases which are ...

Biomass fuels can significantly mitigate global warming

Biomass fuels derived from various grasses could significantly mitigate global warming by reducing carbon, according to a long-term field study by researchers at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) and Michigan State ...

Containing methane and its contribution to global warming

Methane is a gas that deserves more attention in the climate debate as it contributes to almost half of human-made global warming in the short-term. A new IIASA study shows that it is possible to significantly contribute ...

CO2 tracking in space

CO2 concentrations in the air continue to rise rapidly, and a rapid reduction in man-made emissions is becoming increasingly important. In order to assess the effectiveness of political measures, timely and reliable emission ...

What to do when cutting emissions alone is no longer enough

Global emissions reach about 40 billion tons each year. Such a massive number can be hard to conceptualize, but chemical engineer Jennifer Wilcox offers some context: Approximately 10 billion of these come from the transportation ...

New material created to clean up fossil fuel industry

Researchers at the University of Sydney have created a new material that has the potential to reduce CO2 emissions released during the refinement process of crude oil by up to 28 percent.

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List of countries by carbon dioxide emissions

This is a list of sovereign states by carbon dioxide emissions due to human activity. The data presented below corresponds to emissions in 2004. The data itself was collected in 2007 by the CDIAC for United Nations. The data considers only carbon dioxide emissions from the burning of fossil fuels, but not emissions from deforestation, and fossil fuel exporters, etc.

These statistics are rapidly dated due to huge recent growth of emissions in Asia. The United States is the 10th largest emitter of carbon dioxide emissions per capita as of 2004. According to preliminary estimates, since 2006 China has had a higher total emission due to its much larger population and an increase of emissions from power generation. China is the 91st largest emitter of carbon dioxide emissions per capita as of 2004.

Some dependencies and territories whose independence has not been generally recognized are also included, as they are in source data.

Certain entities are mentioned here for purposes of comparison. These are indicated in italics and are not counted in the ordering of sovereign states. (See also: carbon cycle)

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA