A whiff of tears reduces male aggression, says study

Watching someone cry often evokes an emotional response—but according to a new study published Thursday, human tears themselves contain a chemical signal that reduces brain activity linked to aggression.

Rare echidna noises could be the 'language of love'

Curtin University researchers have captured rare recordings of echidnas cooing, grunting and making a range of other sounds, but only during the breeding season. Published in Journal of Zoology, the research is titled "Sound ...

How air pollution is making life tougher for bugs

Whether you love them or loathe them, we all depend on bugs. Insects help to pollinate three-quarters of the world's crop varieties, making them a treasured resource.

Heat-stressed fish embryos can induce stress in nearby embryos

Heat-stressed fish embryos release chemical signals that change the appearance, behavior, and development of fish embryos that were not heat stressed, according to a study. Stress during development can change how an embryo ...

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