Life under extreme conditions at hot springs in the ocean

The volcanic island of Kueishantao in northeastern Taiwan is an extreme habitat for marine organisms. With an active volcano, the coastal area has a unique hydrothermal field with a multitude of hot springs and volcanic gases. ...

New 3-D printing technique produces 'living' 4-D materials

Repairing and reusing plastics and delivering cancer drugs more effectively are only two of many of the potential applications a new 3-D/4-D printing technology might have, thanks to the pioneering work of a research collaboration ...

Bacterial protein impairs important cellular processes

Areas of skin that have been damaged by an injury are ideal niches for the concentration of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a bacterium which impairs the healing process in tissue and creates favorable conditions for infections. ...

Observing changes in the chirality of molecules in real time

Some molecules can exist in two mirror-image forms, similar to our hands. Although such so-called enantiomers have almost identical physical properties, they are not the same. The fact that they behave to each other like ...

Light at the end of the nanotunnel for future catalysts

Using a new type of nanoreactor, researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have mapped catalytic reactions on individual metallic nanoparticles. Their work could improve chemical processes, and lead to better ...

Nitrous oxide emissions set to rise in the Pacific Ocean

The acidification of the Pacific Ocean in northern Japan is increasing the natural production rate of N2O, an ozone-depleting greenhouse gas. That's the finding of a study carried out jointly by scientists at EPFL, Tokyo ...

Bio-inspired nano-catalyst guides chiral reactions

Many medicines are twisted molecules with two mirror image versions, but the body uses only one. Inspired by photosynthetic bacteria, a team at the University of Michigan built a catalyst that guides chemical reactions toward ...

New center to replace oil and gas with sustainable chemistry

Many of the things that surround us are chemically derived from fossil gas and oil—from washing powders to phones to pharmaceuticals. As such, chemistry contributes to CO2 emissions in the same way as, for example, flying ...

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