Oceans saved us, now we can return the favor

Humanity must heal oceans made sick by climate change, pollution and overfishing in order to rescue marine life and save ourselves, experts warned ahead of a major UN conference opening Monday in Lisbon.

Carbon cycle in microbial ecosystems of biological soil crusts

As greenhouse effects become increasingly prominent, soil carbon has been a major focus of research on climate change. Soil microorganisms are the key groups that drive soil carbon transformation. Due to the complexity of ...

Antagonistic interactions of plant defense compounds

A combined defense of different chemical defense substances could result in a negative interaction and mutual detoxification, according to researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in a new study, appearing ...

Smoke from wildfires ages in the atmosphere

Emissions, like smoke from wildfires and exhaust from vehicles, go through chemical changes when they enter the atmosphere. New research from the University of Georgia shows, for the first time, that these changes may affect ...

Can algae unlock the secrets of photosynthesis?

A team led by current and former Carnegie plant biologists has undertaken the largest ever functional genomic study of a photosynthetic organism. Their work, published in Nature Genetics, could inform strategies for improving ...

Self-propelled, endlessly programmable artificial cilia

For years, scientists have been attempting to engineer tiny, artificial cilia for miniature robotic systems that can perform complex motions, including bending, twisting, and reversing. Building these smaller-than-a-human-hair ...

Climate change is pushing toxic chemicals into drinking wells

Don Myron is probably best known as the guy who survived one of the deadliest fires in Oregon's history by sheltering overnight in a river with a patio chair. So there was never any question that Myron would rebuild his home ...

What can plants learn from algae?

Algae have a superpower that help them grow quickly and efficiently. New work led by Carnegie's Adrien Burlacot lays the groundwork for transferring this ability to agricultural crops, which could help feed more people and ...

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