Researchers synthesize 'impossible' superconductor

Researchers from the U.S., Russia, and China have bent the rules of classical chemistry and synthesized a "forbidden" compound of cerium and hydrogen—CeH9—which exhibits superconductivity at a relatively low pressure ...

Shining light on the separation of rare earth metals

Inside smartphones and computer displays are metals known as the rare earths. Mining and purifying these metals involves waste- and energy-intense processes. Better processes are needed. Previous work has shown that specific ...

Electronic entropy enhances water splitting

Researchers have long known that cerium is the best element to use when splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen—a key technique in creating hydrogen gas for fuel. But why, exactly, cerium is so successful has been far ...

New catalyst for the fight against smog

TSU chemists are creating a fundamentally new silver catalyst to purify the air, capable of decomposing toxic carbon monoxide, formaldehyde and other harmful volatile substances into harmless components. This nanostructure ...

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Cerium

Cerium /ˈsɪəriəm/ is a chemical element with the symbol Ce and atomic number 58. It is a soft, silvery, ductile metal which easily oxidizes in air. Cerium was named after the dwarf planet Ceres (itself named for the Roman goddess of agriculture). Cerium is the most abundant of the rare earth elements, making up about 0.0046% of the Earth's crust by weight. It is found in a number of minerals, the most important being monazite and bastnasite. Commercial applications of cerium are numerous. They include catalysts, additives to fuel to reduce emissions and to glass and enamels to change their color. Cerium oxide is an important component of glass polishing powders and phosphors used in screens and fluorescent lamps.

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