Global silicate weathering carbon sink has huge potential

The silicate carbon weathering sink (SCS) is the net carbon sink that affects the global carbon cycle over a period of millions of years or more. However, the magnitude, spatial pattern and evolution characteristics of global ...

Carbon emissions from dams considerably underestimated so far

Among other things, dams serve as reservoirs for drinking water, agricultural irrigation, or the operation of hydropower plants. Until now, it had been assumed that dams act as net carbon stores. Researchers from the Helmholtz ...

Tracking carbon from the ocean surface to the twilight zone

A seaward journey, supported by both NASA and the National Science Foundation, set sail in the northern Atlantic in early May—the sequel to a complementary expedition, co-funded by NSF, that took place in the northern Pacific ...

New model can predict carbon cycle presence on exoplanets

Life thrives at stable temperatures. On Earth, this is facilitated by the carbon cycle. Scientists at SRON, VU and RUG have now developed a model that predicts whether there is a carbon cycle present on exoplanets, provided ...

New catalyst for lower carbon dioxide emissions

If the CO2 content of the atmosphere is not to increase any further, carbon dioxide must be converted into something else. However, as CO2 is a very stable molecule, this can only be done with the help of special catalysts. ...

Streams and rivers emit more carbon dioxide at night than day

Streams and rivers emit large amounts of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, but a new study published in Nature Geoscience led by researchers at the universities in Umeå and Lausanne shows that the flux may be greater than ...

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Carbon cycle

The carbon cycle is the biogeochemical cycle by which carbon is exchanged among the biosphere, pedosphere, geosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere of the Earth.

The carbon cycle is usually thought of as four major reservoirs of carbon interconnected by pathways of exchange. These reservoirs are:

The annual movements of carbon, the carbon exchanges between reservoirs, occur because of various chemical, physical, geological, and biological processes. The ocean contains the largest active pool of carbon near the surface of the Earth, but the deep ocean part of this pool does not rapidly exchange with the atmosphere.

The global carbon budget is the balance of the exchanges (incomes and losses) of carbon between the carbon reservoirs or between one specific loop (e.g., atmosphere ↔ biosphere) of the carbon cycle. An examination of the carbon budget of a pool or reservoir can provide information about whether the pool or reservoir is functioning as a source or sink for carbon dioxide.

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