Related topics: protein · vitamin d

Uncovering the past: Researchers create 3D images of fossils

Idaho National Laboratory is perhaps best known for innovative research that helps shape the clean energy economies of today and tomorrow—and for good reason. But while much of the laboratory's work is focused on building ...

How calcium ions get into the cellular power stations of plants

Calcium is a very special nutrient. In the cells of most living beings calcium ions function as so-called second messengers to transmit important signals. The same applies equally to animal, plant and fungal cells. Through ...

The best offense is a great defense for some carnivorous plants

Insect-eating plants have fascinated biologists for more than a century, but how plants evolved the ability to capture and consume live prey has largely remained a mystery. Now, Salk scientists, along with collaborators from ...

Understanding the calcium carbonate cycle in the North Pacific

Organic carbon and calcium carbonate are two critical components of the ocean's carbon cycle. Organic carbon originates mainly from phytoplankton photosynthesis, which is part of a complex biological pump. Calcium carbonate, ...

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Calcium

Calcium (pronounced /ˈkælsiəm/) is the chemical element with the symbol Ca and atomic number 20. It has an atomic mass of 40.078 amu. Calcium is a soft grey alkaline earth metal, and is the fifth most abundant element by mass in the Earth's crust. Calcium is also the fifth most abundant dissolved ion in seawater by both molarity and mass, after sodium, chloride, magnesium, and sulfate.

Calcium is essential for living organisms, particularly in cell physiology, where movement of the calcium ion Ca2+ into and out of the cytoplasm functions as a signal for many cellular processes. As a major material used in mineralization of bones and shells, calcium is the most abundant metal by mass in many animals.

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