Successful tests of a cooler way to transport electricity

Like a metal python, the huge pipe snaking through a CERN high-tech hall is actually a new electrical transmission line. This superconducting line is the first of its kind and allows vast quantities of electrical current ...

Video: The making of the largest 3-D map of the universe

DESI, the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument, will mobilize 5,000 swiveling robots – each one pointing a thin strand of fiber-optic cable – to gather the light from about 35 million galaxies.

Spacewalking astronauts tackle battery, cable work

Spacewalking astronauts completed battery and cable work outside the International Space Station on Monday despite communication trouble that sometimes made it hard for them to hear.

Energy-efficient superconducting cable for future technologies

For connecting wind parks, for DC supply on ships, or for lightweight and compact high-current cabling in future electric airplanes: scientists of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have developed a versatile superconducting ...

On-chip, electronically tunable frequency comb

Lasers play a vital role in everything from modern communications and connectivity to bio-medicine and manufacturing. Many applications, however, require lasers that can emit multiple frequencies—colors of light—simultaneously, ...

Cable cars could reshape urban landscapes

Cable cars are one of the hallmarks of Switzerland, along with funiculars and paddlewheel boats. They adorn the country's mountaintops like garlands. While cable cars are most often associated with leisure activities in the ...

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Cable

A cable is two or more wires or ropes running side by side and bonded, twisted or braided together to form a single assembly. In mechanics, cables are used for lifting and hauling; in electricity they are used to carry electrical currents. An optical cable contains one or more optical fibers in a protective jacket that supports the fibers. Mechanical cable is more specifically called wire rope.

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