Twisted-wing parasites feel no pain

Reproduction in the insect order Strepsiptera—also known as twisted-wing parasites—is not for the fainthearted. To inseminate the eggs of its partner, the male partner injures the "neck" of the female with its hook-shaped ...

Female urinary tract lactobaccilli can kill pathogenic bacteria

Lactobacilli that live in the human female urinary tract's microbiome are competitive and kill nearby pathogenic bacteria, according to the first study of its kind by a team led by microbiologist Dr. Tanya Sysoeva of The ...

Helping a sea turtle that lost its dive

A juvenile green sea turtle discovered floating in an estuary in Broome has been brought to Murdoch University's Animal Hospital for a CT scan.

Herbivorous mammals have bigger bellies

As an international study conducted by the University of Zurich based on 3-D reconstructions of animal skeletons reveals for the first time: Herbivorous mammals have bigger bellies than their usually slim carnivorous counterparts. ...

Scientists take aim at disease-carrying 'kissing bug'

An international research team, including scientists from Simon Fraser University, hopes its study of the vector Rhodnius prolixus—also known as the "kissing bug" and a major contributor to Chagas disease —will further ...

Transforming living cells into tiny lasers

In the last few decades, lasers have become an important part of our lives, with applications ranging from laser pointers and CD players to medical and research uses. Lasers typically have a very well-defined direction of ...

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