Improved catalytic processes for the synthesis of phenol

Researchers at the University of Electro-communications, Tokyo report a single-site catalytic platform with high selectivity for the single-step synthesis of phenol in a paper appeared in ACS catalysis.

Self-sorting through molecular geometries

Researchers at Kanazawa University report in Communications Chemistry that certain pentagonal and hexagonal organic molecules exhibit self-sorting. The effect can be used to grow multilayered tubular structures that preserve ...

A fast and efficient method for graphene nanoribbon synthesis

Nanographenes are attracting wide interest from many researchers as a powerful candidate for the next generation of carbon materials due to their unique electric properties. Scientists at Nagoya University have now developed ...

Calcium compound breaks 'like repels like' rule

(Phys.org)—A combined team of chemists from the University of Bath in the U.K. and Université Toulouse III–Paul Sabatier, UMR in France has found an instance of a calcium compound breaking the 'like repels like' chemistry ...

Making molecules that twinkle

Researchers at Singapore's Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR) have harnessed the power of carbon dioxide to make two symmetrical star-shaped molecules in a single step. These molecules could be used to build ...

page 1 from 5

Benzene

Benzene is an organic chemical compound. It is composed of 6 carbon atoms in a ring, with 1 hydrogen atom attached to each carbon atom, with the molecular formula C6H6.

Benzene is a natural constituent of crude oil, and is one of the most basic petrochemicals. Benzene is an aromatic hydrocarbon and the second [n]-annulene ([6]-annulene), a cyclic hydrocarbon with a continuous pi bond. It is sometimes abbreviated Ph–H. Benzene is a colorless and highly flammable liquid with a sweet smell. Because it is a known carcinogen, its use as an additive in gasoline is now limited, but it is an important industrial solvent and precursor to basic industrial chemicals including drugs, plastics, synthetic rubber, and dyes.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA