Related topics: bats

Bat souvenir trade and risks to public health

Little is known about the global bat souvenir trade, its extent and impact on bat populations and forest ecosystems, and the potential risks posed to public health with bats known carriers of zoonotic diseases.

Deadly white-nose syndrome changed genes in surviving bats

Scientists have found genetic differences between bats killed by white-nose syndrome and bats that survived, suggesting that survivors rapidly evolve to resist the fungal disease, according to a Rutgers-led study with big ...

Bats are hosts to a range of viruses but don't get sick – why?

Bats harbour many diverse viruses, including coronaviruses. Indeed, SARS, Mers and COVID-19—which are all caused by coronaviruses—are thought to have emerged from bats. These diseases can be deadly to humans, yet bats ...

DNA helps conservation of elusive tequila bat

Scientists studying the near-threatened tequila bat, best known for its vital role in pollinating the Blue Agave plant from which the drink of the same name is made from, have analyzed its DNA to help inform conservationists ...

Flying foxes in South Australia exposed to zoonotic viruses

University of Adelaide researchers have found that South Australia's population of Grey-headed flying foxes, which took up residence in 2010, has been exposed to a number of viruses, including Hendra virus that can be transmitted ...

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