Related topics: bats

Bats are hosts to a range of viruses but don't get sick – why?

Bats harbour many diverse viruses, including coronaviruses. Indeed, SARS, Mers and COVID-19—which are all caused by coronaviruses—are thought to have emerged from bats. These diseases can be deadly to humans, yet bats ...

DNA helps conservation of elusive tequila bat

Scientists studying the near-threatened tequila bat, best known for its vital role in pollinating the Blue Agave plant from which the drink of the same name is made from, have analyzed its DNA to help inform conservationists ...

Flying foxes in South Australia exposed to zoonotic viruses

University of Adelaide researchers have found that South Australia's population of Grey-headed flying foxes, which took up residence in 2010, has been exposed to a number of viruses, including Hendra virus that can be transmitted ...

Are bats to blame for the coronavirus crisis?

Horseshoe bats in China are a natural wildlife reservoir of SARS-like coronaviruses. Some health experts think wildlife markets—specifically in Wuhan, China—led to the spillover of the new coronavirus into human populations. ...

Predicting the impacts of white-nose syndrome in bats

Since 2005, millions of bats have perished from white-nose syndrome, a disease caused by the fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans. Although the disease has been found throughout much of the world, severe population declines ...

New DNA screening reveals blood sources for vampire bats

The vampire bat's diet consists of blood. It prefers to feed on domestic animals such as cows and pigs, but when it does so, there is a risk of transmitting pathogens such as rabies. Now, a new study lead by Assistant Professor ...

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