Related topics: chimpanzees · primates

How baboons keep healthy family boundaries

Finding love in a small isolated place can be tough when everyone is a familiar face, or when half the dating pool is already out because they're all close relatives.

No time to nap in nature

The first study ever to examine sleeping behavior in a wild group of primates has challenged a central tenet of sleep science: that we must make up for lost sleep. Even after sleeping poorly, wild baboons still spent time ...

Experiment reveals social conventions between baboons

A research team from the CNRS and Aix-Marseille Université has demonstrated that members of a group of baboons can establish shared social conventions—in this case, by all agreeing on how to solve a problem in order to ...

For animal societies, cohesion comes at a cost

From gaining valuable information to staying safe from predators, moving in a group can benefit animals—but at what cost? Researchers from the Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior have provided rare insight into the ...

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Baboon

Papio hamadryas Papio papio Papio anubis Papio cynocephalus Papio ursinus

Baboons are African Old World monkeys belonging to the genus Papio, part of the subfamily Cercopithecinae. There are five species, which are some of the largest non-hominid members of the primate order; only the Mandrill and the Drill are larger. Previously, the closely related Gelada (genus Theropithecus) and two species of Mandrill and Drill (genus Mandrillus) were grouped in the same genus, and these Old World monkeys are still often referred to as baboons in everyday speech. They range in size and weight depending on species. The Guinea Baboon is 50 cm (20 inches) and weighs only 14 kg (30 lb) while the largest Chacma Baboon can be 120 cm (47 inches) and weigh 40 kg (90 lb). A group of baboons is collectively called a troop.

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