Related topics: chimpanzees · primates

Baboon sexes differ in how social status gets 'under the skin'

A growing body of evidence shows that those at the bottom of the socioeconomic ladder are more likely to die prematurely than those at the top. The pattern isn't unique to humans: Across many social animals, the lower an ...

Baboons shed light on antimicrobial resistance

Antibiotic resistance is an ancient feature of gut microbial communities and sharing habitat with humans has had an important impact on the structure and function of gut microbiota of non-human primates, according to a study ...

Mass baboon breakout shuts Paris zoo

Around 50 baboons escaped from their enclosure in Paris's main zoo on Friday, forcing wardens to evacuate visitors while order was restored, the zoo said.

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Baboon

Papio hamadryas Papio papio Papio anubis Papio cynocephalus Papio ursinus

Baboons are African Old World monkeys belonging to the genus Papio, part of the subfamily Cercopithecinae. There are five species, which are some of the largest non-hominid members of the primate order; only the Mandrill and the Drill are larger. Previously, the closely related Gelada (genus Theropithecus) and two species of Mandrill and Drill (genus Mandrillus) were grouped in the same genus, and these Old World monkeys are still often referred to as baboons in everyday speech. They range in size and weight depending on species. The Guinea Baboon is 50 cm (20 inches) and weighs only 14 kg (30 lb) while the largest Chacma Baboon can be 120 cm (47 inches) and weigh 40 kg (90 lb). A group of baboons is collectively called a troop.

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