Attosecond measurement on electrons in water clusters

Virtually all vital chemical processes take place in aqueous solutions. In such processes, a decisive role is played by electrons that are exchanged between different atoms and molecules and thus, for instance, create or ...

Decoding electron dynamics

Electron motion in atoms and molecules is of fundamental importance to many physical, biological and chemical processes. Exploring electron dynamics within atoms and molecules is essential for understanding and manipulating ...

Attosecond interferometry in time-energy domain

The space-momentum domain interferometer is a key technique in modern precision measurements, and has been widely used for applications that require superb spatial resolution in engineering metrology and astronomy. Extending ...

Researchers demonstrate attosecond boost for electron microscopy

A team of physicists from the University of Konstanz and Ludwig-Maximilians-Universit√§t M√ľnchen in Germany have achieved attosecond time resolution in a transmission electron microscope by combining it with a continuous-wave ...

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Attosecond

An attosecond is an SI unit of time equal to 10−18 of a second. (one quintillionth of a second). For context, an attosecond is to a second what a second is to about 31.71 billion years, or twice the age of the universe.

The word "attosecond" is formed by the prefix atto and the unit second. Atto- was made from the Danish word for eighteen (atten). Its symbol is as.

An attosecond is equal to 1000 zeptoseconds, or 1/1000 of a femtosecond. Because the next higher SI unit for time is the femtosecond (10−15 seconds), durations of 10−17 s and 10−16 s will typically be expressed as tens or hundreds of attoseconds:

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