Researchers report quantum-limit-approaching chemical sensing chip

University at Buffalo researchers are reporting an advancement of a chemical sensing chip that could lead to handheld devices that detect trace chemicals—everything from illicit drugs to pollution—as quickly as a breathalyzer ...

Producing materials to help break the electronics scaling limit

Ph.D. candidate Saravana Balaji Basuvalingam at the TU/e Department of Applied Physics has developed a new approach to grow, in a controlled and effective way, a library of so-called "TMC materials" with various properties ...

Researchers develop new atomic layer deposition process

A new way to deposit thin layers of atoms as a coating onto a substrate material at near room temperatures has been invented at The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), a part of the University of Alabama System.

New catalyst turns greenhouse gases into hydrogen gas

A new nanocatalyst that recycles major greenhouse gasses, such as carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4), into highly value-added hydrogen (H2) gas has been developed. This catalyst is expected to greatly contribute to the ...

New chemistry for ultra-thin gas sensors

The application of zinc oxide layers in industry is manifold and ranges from the protection of degradable goods to the detection of toxic nitrogen oxide gas. Such layers can be deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) which ...

Chemistry paves the way for improved electronic materials

Indium nitride is a promising material for use in electronics, but difficult to manufacture. Scientists at Linköping University, Sweden, have developed a new molecule that can be used to create high-quality indium nitride, ...

Polymer membranes could benefit from taking a dip

Many industrial processes rely on thin membranes that can clean water, for example, by filtering out impurities. In recent years, a technique called atomic layer deposition (ALD) has been used to tune these membranes for ...

A cheaper way to scale up atomic layer deposition

Chemical engineers at EPFL have developed a new method for atomic layer deposition, a technique commonly used in high-quality microelectronics. The new method can be used in materials with larger surfaces much more cheaply ...

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