Help NASA scientists find clouds on Mars

NASA scientists hope to solve a fundamental mystery about Mars' atmosphere, and you can help. They've organized a project called Cloudspotting on Mars that invites the public to identify Martian clouds using the citizen science ...

Superhard material synthesis made cheaper

Skoltech researchers and their colleagues from Tomsk Polytechnic University have proposed an efficient and inexpensive way to synthesize superhard tungsten boride, used in drilling and other industrial technologies. The research ...

Which parts of Mars are the safest from cosmic radiation?

In the coming decade, NASA and China plan to send the first crewed missions to Mars. This will consist of both agencies sending spacecraft in 2033, 2035, 2037, and every 26 months after that to coincide with Mars opposition ...

Reconstructing sea-level rise in the Red Sea

Modeling the impact of meteorological forces on the Red Sea shows that winds in the southern part of the sea modulate sea-level surges across the basin.

A surprisingly soft mineral may control how Earth recycles rocks

The geological events we see on the surface of the Earth as mountains, volcanoes and earthquakes are expressions of processes that are happening deep in our planet. Here on the Earth's crust, we're part of a conveyor belt ...

What is a bomb cyclone? An atmospheric scientist explains

A bomb cyclone is a large, intense midlatitude storm that has low pressure at its center, weather fronts and an array of associated weather, from blizzards to severe thunderstorms to heavy precipitation. It becomes a bomb ...

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Atmospheric pressure

Atmospheric pressure is sometimes defined as the force per unit area exerted against a surface by the weight of air above that surface at any given point in the Earth's atmosphere. In most circumstances atmospheric pressure is closely approximated by the hydrostatic pressure caused by the weight of air above the measurement point. Low pressure areas have less atmospheric mass above their location, whereas high pressure areas have more atmospheric mass above their location. Similarly, as elevation increases there is less overlying atmospheric mass, so that pressure decreases with increasing elevation. A column of air one square inch in cross-section, measured from sea level to the top of the atmosphere, would weigh approximately 65.5 newtons (14.7 lbf). The weight of a 1 m2 (11 sq ft) column of air would be about 101 kN (10.3 tf).

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