Looking for lurkers —a new way to do SETI

The most recently discovered group of rocky bodies nearby Earth are termed co-orbital objects. These may have been an attractive location for extraterrestrial intelligence (ETI) to locate a probe to observe Earth throughout ...

Astronomers map vast void in our cosmic neighborhood

An astronomer from the University of Hawaiʻi Institute for Astronomy (IfA) and an international team published a new study that reveals more of the vast cosmic structure surrounding our Milky Way galaxy.

Interstellar iron isn't missing, it's just hiding in plain sight

Astrophysicists know that iron (chemical symbol: Fe) is one of the most abundant elements in the universe, after lightweight elements such as hydrogen, carbon, and oxygen. Iron is most commonly found in gaseous form in stars ...

Image: Storm in the Teacup quasar

This image shows a quasar nicknamed the Teacup due to its shape. A quasar is an active galaxy that is powered by material falling into its central supermassive black hole. They are extremely luminous objects located at great ...

Research on disk galaxies sheds light on movement of stars

University of Arkansas astrophysicists have taken an important step toward solving the mystery of how disk galaxies maintain the shape of their spiral arms. Their findings support the theory that these arms are created by ...

Growing magnetic fields in deep space: Just wiggle the plasma

Contrary to what many people believe, outer space is not empty. In addition to an electrically charged soup of ions and electrons known as plasma, space is permeated by magnetic fields with a wide range of strengths. Astrophysicists ...

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Astrophysical Journal

The Astrophysical Journal (abbreviated to ApJ or Astrophys. J.) is a scientific journal covering astronomy and astrophysics. It was founded in 1895 by the American astronomers George Ellery Hale and James E. Keeler. As of October 2006 it published three 500-page issues per month.

Since 1953, The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series (often abbreviated to ApJS) has been published in conjunction with The Astrophysical Journal. It aims to supplement the material in the Journal. As of October 2006 it published six volumes per year, with two 280-page issues per volume. The journal and the supplement series were both published by the University of Chicago Press for the American Astronomical Society. In January 2009 publication was transferred to Institute of Physics Publishing, following the move of the society's Astronomical Journal in 2008. The reason for the changes were given by the Society as the increasing financial demands of the Press.

The Astrophysical Journal Letters (ApJL) is Part 2 of The Astrophysical Journal — a peer-reviewed express scientific journal.

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