Related topics: stars · galaxies · neutron stars · black holes · star formation

Fermi spots a supernova's 'fizzled' gamma-ray burst

On Aug. 26, 2020, NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope detected a pulse of high-energy radiation that had been racing toward Earth for nearly half the present age of the universe. Lasting only about a second, it turned ...

GLOSTAR: Tracing atomic and molecular gas in the Milky Way

By combining two of the most powerful radio telescopes on Earth, an international team of researchers led by the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy (MPIfR) in Bonn, created the most sensitive maps of the radio emission ...

Cosmic rays help supernovae explosions pack a bigger punch

The final stage of cataclysmic explosions of dying massive stars, called supernovae, could pack an up to six times bigger punch on the surrounding interstellar gas with the help of cosmic rays, according to a new study led ...

Researchers examine properties of supernova SN 2012au

An international team of astronomers has performed photometric, polarimetric and spectroscopic observations of the Type Ib supernova SN 2012au. Results of this comprehensive study deliver important information regarding the ...

Cosmic 'hand' hitting a wall

Motions of a remarkable cosmic structure have been measured for the first time, using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. The blast wave and debris from an exploded star are seen moving away from the explosion site and colliding ...

First clear view of a boiling cauldron where stars are born

University of Maryland researchers created the first high-resolution image of an expanding bubble of hot plasma and ionized gas where stars are born. Previous low-resolution images did not clearly show the bubble or reveal ...

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List of most massive stars

This is a list of the most massive stars. The list is ordered by solar mass (1 solar mass = the mass of Earth's Sun).

Stellar mass is the most important attribute of a star. Combined with chemical compositions, mass determines a star’s luminosity, its physical size, and its ultimate fate. Due to their mass, most of the stars below will eventually go supernova or hypernova, and form black holes.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA