Related topics: stars · galaxies · neutron stars · black holes · star formation

3-D holograms bringing astronomy to life

Scientists working on unravelling the mysteries of star cluster formation have found an innovative way of sharing their work with the general public. Taking inspiration from a 19th century magic trick, researchers from the ...

Smash and grab: A heavyweight stellar champion for dying stars

Dying stars that cast off their outer envelopes to form the beautiful yet enigmatic "planetary nebulae" (PNe) have a new heavy-weight champion, the innocuously named PNe BMP1613-5406. Massive stars live fast and die young, ...

Hubble sets sights on an explosive galaxy

When massive stars die at the end of their short lives, they light up the cosmos with bright, explosive bursts of light and material known as supernovae. A supernova event is incredibly energetic and intensely luminous—so ...

Hubble observes tiny galaxy with big heart

Nestled within this field of bright foreground stars lies ESO 495-21, a tiny galaxy with a big heart. ESO 495-21 may be just 3000 light-years across, but that is not stopping the galaxy from furiously forming huge numbers ...

Why do massive (and not-so-massive) stars form?

The Milky Way Project: Probing Star Formation with a New Yellowball Catalog presents a study of 518 infant star-forming regions known as "Yellowballs," drawn from a catalog made possible by the efforts of citizen scientists. ...

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List of most massive stars

This is a list of the most massive stars. The list is ordered by solar mass (1 solar mass = the mass of Earth's Sun).

Stellar mass is the most important attribute of a star. Combined with chemical compositions, mass determines a star’s luminosity, its physical size, and its ultimate fate. Due to their mass, most of the stars below will eventually go supernova or hypernova, and form black holes.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA