The blast that shook the ionosphere

Just after 6 p.m. local time (15.00 UTC) on August 4, 2020, more than 2,750 tons worth of unsafely stored ammonium nitrate exploded in Lebanon's port city of Beirut, killing around 200 people, making more than 300,000 temporarily ...

Ammonium triggers formation of lateral roots

Despite the importance of changes in root architecture to exploit local nutrient patches, mechanisms integrating external nutrient signals into the root developmental program remain poorly understood. "Here, we show for the ...

Methane-eating bacteria like nitrogen, too

Methane-eating bacteria can degrade ammonium in addition to methane, as discovered by microbiologists at Radboud University and the Max Planck Institute in Bremen. Methane-eaters are important for the reduction of greenhouses ...

Map of ammonium's journey 'could prevent infection'

The mechanism of a protein which transports ammonium across cell membranes has been discovered in research led at the University of Strathclyde, which could lay the foundations for preventing infection.

How bacteria fertilize soya

Plants need nitrogen in the form of ammonium if they are to grow. In the case of a great many cultivated plants, farmers are obliged to spread this ammonium on their fields as fertiliser. Manufacturing ammonium is an energy-intensive ...

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Ammonium

The ammonium (more obscurely: aminium) cation is a positively charged polyatomic cation with the chemical formula NH+ 4. It is formed by the protonation of ammonia (NH3). Ammonium is also a general name for positively charged or protonated substituted amines and quaternary ammonium cations (N+R4), where one or more hydrogen atoms are replaced by organic radical groups (indicated by R).

In the substitutive nomenclature NH4+ is denoted by the name azanium instead of ammonium.

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