New center to replace oil and gas with sustainable chemistry

Many of the things that surround us are chemically derived from fossil gas and oil—from washing powders to phones to pharmaceuticals. As such, chemistry contributes to CO2 emissions in the same way as, for example, flying ...

Monitoring the corrosion of bioresorbable magnesium

ETH researchers have recently been able to monitor the corrosion of bioresorbable magnesium alloys at the nanoscale over a time scale of a few seconds to many hours. This is an important step towards accurately predicting ...

Insights on service life of industrial components

It is of technological importance to understand the accumulation of plastic damage or deformation in components under various operating conditions in order to estimate their service lifetime.

Physicists create metallic alloy for magnetic refrigerator

Physicists at the Laboratory of Novel Magnetic Materials of the Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University study magnetic materials and magnetostructural phase transition in order to create a new magnetic cooling technology. ...

X-ray mapping enhances potential of lightweight magnesium

A world-first study led by Monash University has discovered a technique and phenomenon that can be used for creating stronger, lightweight magnesium alloys that could improve structural integrity in the automobile and aerospace ...

New technique allows real-time microscopy at high heat and loading

Researchers have demonstrated a technique that allows them to track microscopic changes in metals or other materials in real time even when the materials are exposed to extreme heat and loads for an extended period of time—a ...

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Alloy

An alloy is a mixture or metallic solid solution composed of two or more elements. Complete solid solution alloys give single solid phase microstructure, while partial solutions give two or more phases that may or may not be homogeneous in distribution, depending on thermal (heat treatment) history. Alloys usually have different properties from those of the component elements.

Alloy constituents are usually measured by mass. Alloys are usually classified as substitutional or interstitial alloys, depending on the atomic arrangement that forms the alloy. They can be further classified as homogeneous, consisting of a single phase, heterogeneous, consisting of two or more phases, or intermetallic, where there is no distinct boundary between phases.

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