The University of Tokyo (東京大学, Tōkyō daigaku), abbreviated as Todai (東大, Tōdai), is a research university located in Tokyo, Japan. The University has 10 faculties with a total of around 30,000 students, 2,100 of whom are foreign. Its five campuses are in Hongō, Komaba, Kashiwa, Shirokane and Nakano. It is considered to be the most prestigious university in Japan. It ranks as the highest in Asia and 21st in the world in 2013 according to Academic Ranking of World Universities. The university was chartered by the Meiji government in 1877 under its current name by amalgamating older government schools for medicine and Western learning. It was renamed "the Imperial University (帝國大學, Teikoku daigaku)" in 1886, and then Tokyo Imperial University (東京帝國大學, Tōkyō teikoku daigaku) in 1897 when the Imperial University system was created. In September 1923, an earthquake and the following fires destroyed about 700,000 volumes of the Imperial University Library. The books lost included the Hoshino Library (星野文庫, Hoshino bunko), a collection of about 10,000 books.

Address
7-3-1, Hongō, Bunkyo, Tokyo, Japan
Website
http://www.u-tokyo.ac.jp/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/University_of_Tokyo

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Researchers add order to polymer gels

Gel-like materials have a wide range of applications, especially in chemistry and medicine. However, their usefulness is sometimes limited by their inherent random and disordered nature. Researchers from the University of ...

A new view for glasses

Researchers at the University of Tokyo introduced a new physical model that predicts the dynamics of glassy materials based solely on their local degree of atomic structural order. Using computer simulations, they showed ...

A new spin on life's origin?

A research team at The University of Tokyo has reproducibly synthesized staircase-like supramolecules of a single handedness, or chirality, using standard laboratory equipment. By gradually removing the solvent from a rotating ...

Keeping cool with quantum wells

University of Tokyo researchers have announced a new approach for electrical cooling without the need for moving parts. By applying a bias voltage to quantum wells made of the semiconductor aluminum gallium arsenide, electrons ...

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