Rooting the family tree of placental mammals

Placental mammals consist of three main groups that diverged rapidly, evolving in wildly different directions: Afrotheria (for example, elephants and tenrecs), Xenarthra (such as armadillos and sloths) and Boreoeutheria (all ...

Sudden onset of ice loss in Antarctica detected

A group of scientists, led by a team from the University of Bristol, UK has observed a sudden increase of ice loss in a previously stable region of Antarctica. The research is published today in Science.

Repulsive interactions

(PhysOrg.com) -- The recent state of the roads is a clear illustration of what happens when water freezes into crystals of ice. But despite its frequent occurrence, the crystallisation of water is remarkably difficult to ...

What dinosaurs' colour patterns say about their habitat

After reconstructing the colour patterns of a well-preserved dinosaur from China, researchers from the University of Bristol have found that the long-lost species Psittacosaurus (meaning "parrot lizard", a reference to its ...

Study sheds new light on the diet of extinct animals

A study of tooth enamel in mammals living today in the equatorial forest of Gabon could ultimately shed light on the diet of long extinct animals, according to new research from the University of Bristol.

Research reveals why the zebra got its stripes

Why do zebras have stripes? A study published in PLOS ONE today takes us another step closer to answering this puzzling question and to understanding how stripes actually work.

Optical chip enables new approach to quantum computing

An international research group led by scientists from the University of Bristol has developed a new approach to quantum computing that could soon be used to perform complex calculations that cannot be done by today's computers.

The success of the plant-eating dinosaurs

There has been a long debate about why dinosaurs were so successful. Say dinosaur, and most people think of the great flesh-eaters such as Tyrannosaurus rex, but the most successful dinosaurs were of course the plant-eaters.

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