SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) was originally called Stanford Linear Accelerator Center when it was established in 1962 on some land owned by Stanford University in California. SLAC is an arm of the Department of Energy and is managed and operated by Stanford University. SLAC has produced three Nobel Prize winners and focuses on experimental, theoretical research in elementary particle physics, atomic and solid-state physics, chemistry, biology, astrophysics and medicine. SLAC offers internships and fellowships for studies. SLAC publishes the latest in breaking physics, astrophysics and interdisciplinary research. Media inquiries are welcome and the news page is complete.

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2575 Sand Hill Road Menlo Park, CA 94025
Website
http://www.slac.stanford.edu/
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SLAC

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New nanostructure for batteries keeps going and going

(Phys.org) -- For more than a decade, scientists have tried to improve lithium-based batteries by replacing the graphite in one terminal with silicon, which can store 10 times more charge. But after just a few charge/discharge ...

First movies of droplets getting blown up by x-ray laser

Researchers have made the first microscopic movies of liquids getting vaporized by the world's brightest X-ray laser at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The new data could lead to better and ...

SLAC researchers recreate the extreme universe in the lab

Conditions in the vast universe can be quite extreme: Violent collisions scar the surfaces of planets. Nuclear reactions in bright stars generate tremendous amounts of energy. Gigantic explosions catapult matter far out into ...

'Accelerator on a chip' demonstrated

In an advance that could dramatically shrink particle accelerators for science and medicine, researchers used a laser to accelerate electrons at a rate 10 times higher than conventional technology in a nanostructured glass ...

Tiny device grabs more solar energy to disinfect water faster

In many parts of the world, the only way to make germy water safe is by boiling, which consumes precious fuel, or by putting it out in the sun in a plastic bottle so ultraviolet rays will kill the microbes. But because UV ...

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