The Santa Fe Institute (SFI) is an independent, nonprofit theoretical research institute located in Santa Fe (New Mexico, United States) and dedicated to the multidisciplinary study of the fundamental principles of complex adaptive systems, including physical, computational, biological, and social systems. The Institute houses a small number of resident faculty, who collaborate with many affiliated and visiting scholars. Although theoretical scientific research is the Institute's primary focus, it hosts a number of complex systems summer schools, internships, and other educational programs throughout the year. The Institute's annual funding is derived primarily from private donors, grant-making foundations, government science agencies, and companies affiliated with its Business Network. The Santa Fe Institute was founded in 1984 by scientists George Cowan, David Pines, Stirling Colgate, Murray Gell-Mann, Nick Metropolis, Herb Anderson, Peter A. Carruthers, and Richard Slansky.

Website
http://www.santafe.edu
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Santa_Fe_Institute

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Subscribe to rss feed

How much would you pay to change a game before playing it?

When most people think of a "game," they might imagine checkers or hopscotch. But in game theory, a game is defined as any type of scenario where there's an interaction between different decision-makers, or players, each ...

Perception biases in social networks

The result of the 2016 US presidential election was, for many, a surprise lesson in social perception bias—peoples' tendency to assume that others think as we do, and to underestimate the size and influence of a minority ...

Hidden genetic variations power evolutionary leaps

Laboratory populations that quietly amass 'cryptic' genetic variants are capable of surprising evolutionary leaps, according to a paper in the July 26 issue of Science. A better understanding of cryptic variation may improve ...

How random tweaks in timing can lead to new game theory strategies

Most game theory models don't reflect the relentlessly random timing of the real world. In some models, players may receive information at the same time, and they act simultaneously. Others may include randomness in terms ...

A new normal: Study explains universal pattern in fossil record

Throughout life's history on earth, biological diversity has gone through ebbs and flows—periods of rapid evolution and of dramatic extinctions. We know this, at least in part, through the fossil record of marine invertebrates ...

'Law as Data' explores radical leap for legal analysis

Four thousand years ago, human societies underwent a fundamental transition when the rules governing how people interact shifted from oral custom to written laws: first captured in stone tablets such as the Code of Hammurabi, ...

'Pedigree is not destiny' when it comes to scholarly success

What matters more to a scientist's career success: where they currently work, or where they got their Ph.D.? It's a question a team of researchers teases apart in a new paper published in PNAS. Their analysis calls into question ...

Group decisions: When more information isn't necessarily better

In nature, group decisions are often a matter of life or death. At first glance, the way certain groups of animals like minnows branch off into smaller sub-groups might seem counterproductive to their survival. After all, ...

At last, acknowledging royal women's political power

The narratives we tell about the past often feature a cast of familiar main characters: kings and rulers, warriors and diplomats—men who made laws and fought wars, who held power over others in their own lands and beyond. ...

page 1 from 15