The Royal Astronomical Society, (RAS) was established in 1820. The RAS is headquartered in London. The primary mission of RAS is to encourage and promote the study of astronomy, solar-system science, geophysics, and closely related branches of science. RAS accomplishes this mission by publishing scientific studies in journals, the award of modest grants, educational activities and makes available a superior reference library. Membership to RAS is available to anyone with an interest in the fields of endeavors promoted by RAS. Primarily members are students, geophysicists, astronomers and related professionals.

Address
Burlington House, Piccadilly, London W1J 0BQ United Kingdom
Website
http://www.ras.org.uk/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Astronomical_Society

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Subscribe to rss feed

Galactic bar paradox resolved in cosmic dance

New light has been shed on a mysterious and long-standing conundrum at the very heart of our galaxy. The new work offers a potential solution to the so-called "Galactic bar paradox," whereby different observations produce ...

New insights into star formation in the smallest galaxies

The question of how small, dwarf galaxies have sustained the formation of new stars over the course of the Universe has long confounded the world's astronomers. Now, an international research team has found that dormant small ...

New hints of volcanism under the heart of northern Europe

Scientists have discovered new evidence for active volcanism next door to some of the most densely populated areas of Europe. The study 'crowd-sourced' GPS monitoring data from antennae across western Europe to track subtle ...

Ultra-bright X-ray source awakens near a galaxy not so far away

A new ultra-bright source of X-rays has awakened in between our galactic neighbors the Magellanic Clouds, after a 26-year slumber. This is the second-closest such object known to date, with a brightness greater than a million ...

Coming to a sky near you: Comet SWAN at its best

Comet C/2020 F8 (SWAN), perhaps the brightest comet we will see this year, is at its best from now until mid-June. It should be visible in from the UK in the northwestern sky after sunset, close to the horizon.

Rare transit of Mercury to take place on 11 November

A rare transit of Mercury will take place on 11 November, when the smallest planet in our Solar System will pass directly between the Earth and the Sun. The last time this happened was in 2016, and the next will be in 2032. ...

Galactic fountains and carousels: order emerging from chaos

Scientists from Germany and the United States have unveiled the results of a newly-completed, state of the art simulation of the evolution of galaxies. TNG50 is the most detailed large-scale cosmological simulation yet. It ...

page 1 from 33