The Norwegian University of Science and Technology, commonly known as NTNU, is located in Trondheim. NTNU is the second largest of the eight universities in Norway, and, as its name suggests, has the main national responsibility for higher education in engineering and technology. In addition to engineering and the natural and physical sciences, the university offers advanced degrees in other academic disciplines ranging from the social sciences, the arts, medicine, architecture and fine art.

Website
http://www.ntnu.edu/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Norwegian_University_of_Science_and_Technology

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Super-strong magnetic supercrystals can assemble themselves

Materials scientists who work with nano-sized components have developed ways of working with their vanishingly small materials. But what if you could get your components to assemble themselves into different structures without ...

Insect or virus? How plants know

Most plants have plenty of enemies, from insects and other grazing creatures to various diseases, droughts and many other stressors.

What doesn't crack them makes them stronger

What doesn't kill us makes us stronger, according to philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche. Who would have thought that a similar notion might apply to materials?

Viking Age mortuary house found in central Norway

A Viking Age mortuary house was discovered during the excavation of the burial ground of one of the Viking Age farms on Vinjeøra in Hemne in Trøndelag. The house measured five by three meters. It had corner posts, and the ...

A 127-year-old physics riddle solved

He solved a 127-year-old physics problem on paper and proved that off-centered boat wakes could exist. Five years later, practical experiments proved him right.

New nanomaterial to replace mercury

The nano research team led by professors Helge Weman and Bjørn-Ove Fimland at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology's (NTNU) Department of Electronic Systems has succeeded in creating light-emitting diodes, ...

When the extreme becomes the norm for Arctic animals

Think of reindeer on Norway's Svalbard archipelago as the arctic equivalent of sloths. It's not a perfect analogy, except that like tropical sloths, Svalbard reindeer move as little as possible to conserve energy.

Explaining a universe composed of matter

The universe consists of a massive imbalance between matter and antimatter. Antimatter and matter are actually the same, but have opposite charges, but there's hardly any antimatter in the observable universe, including the ...

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