Karolinska Institutet

Karolinska Institutet (KI) was established in 1810-1811 for the purpose of training military surgeons in Sweden. KI is the largest medical research center in Stockholm, Sweden and a leading medical university with world-wide respect for their research and technology studies. A KI committee appoints the Nobel Laureates for Physiology or Medicine. KI has numerous Nobel Laureates to their credit over the years. The Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Pharmacology and RNA research are cutting edge in the field of medical research. The medical school is rated highly for patient care and medical research and education.

Address
SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden
E-mail
info@ki.se
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Making biological drugs with spider silk protein

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have managed to synthesise lung surfactant, a drug used in the care of preterm babies, by mimicking the production of spider silk. Animal studies reveal it to be just as effective ...

date12 hours ago in Biochemistry
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Hydraulic forces help to fill the heart

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet and KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden have contributed to a recent discovery that the heart is filled with the aid of hydraulic forces, the same as those involved in hydraulic ...

dateMar 02, 2017 in General Physics
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New software makes CRISPR-methodology easier

Scientists at Karolinska Institutet and the University of Gothenburg have generated a web-based software, Green Listed, which can facilitate the use of the CRISPR methodology. The software is published in the journal Bioinformatics ...

dateJan 02, 2017 in Biotechnology
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Short RNA molecules mapped in single cell

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have measured the absolute numbers of short, non-coding, RNA sequences in individual embryonic stem cells. The new method could improve the understanding of how our genes are regulated ...

dateNov 01, 2016 in Biotechnology
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Why pneumococci affect primarily humans

A special variant of a sugar molecule in the human nose might explain why pneumococcal infections are more common in humans than in other animals, researchers from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden report in a study published ...

dateSep 01, 2016 in Cell & Microbiology
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