The Julius Maximilian University of Würzburg[2] (also referred to as the University of Würzburg, in German Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg) is a public research university in Würzburg, Germany.[2] The University of Wurzburg is one of the oldest institutions of higher learning in Germany, having been founded in 1402. The University initially had a brief run and was closed in 1415. It was reopened in 1582 on the initiative of Julius Echter von Mespelbrunn. Today, the University is named for Julius Echter von Mespelbrunn and Maximilian Joseph.

Website
https://www.uni-wuerzburg.de/en/home/
Wikipedia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/University_of_W%C3%BCrzburg

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What grasshoppers feed on

Anyone walking past a meadow on a mild summer evening is often exposed to an impressive concert. It is the grasshoppers, bush crickets and crickets that create a Mediterranean atmosphere with their chirping. The songs are ...

What makes plants electrically excitable

Plant cells use electrical signals to process and transmit information. In 1987, as a postdoc of Erwin Neher in Göttingen, biophysicist Rainer Hedrich discovered an ion channel in the central vacuole of the plant cell, which ...

Revealing new states in 2D materials

Atomically thin two-dimensional (2D) materials can provide highly interesting excitonic properties, which render them an attractive platform to explore polaritonic physics.

Beetles in climate change

As a result of the droughts of recent years, a pronounced tree mortality that has left clearly visible gaps in forests and parks has been observed in Germany. All climate projections indicate that such events will occur more ...

Sustainable chemistry based on wood

Some hikers carry a small solar power generator with them, a foil attached to their backpack that converts sunlight into electricity. This allows them to charge their devices while on the move. Flexible, thin and lightweight ...

Wild honeybees still exist in Europe

Until recently, experts considered it unlikely that the honeybee had survived as a wild animal in Europe. In a current study, biologists Benjamin Rutschmann and Patrick Kohl from Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg ...

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