The International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) is an international research organization located in Laxenburg, near Vienna, in Austria. IIASA conducts interdisciplinary scientific studies on environmental, economic, technological and social issues in the context of human dimensions of global change. IIASA's mission is "to provide insights and guidance to policymakers worldwide by finding solutions to global and universal problems through applied systems analysis in order to improve human and social wellbeing and to protect the environment." IIASA brings its experience of managing international tensions through science to today's global issues. Its multinational and multidisciplinary teams of researchers have a growing membership, now including the world's four largest economies.

Website
http://www.iiasa.ac.at/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Institute_for_Applied_Systems_Analysis

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Exploring dimensions of justice in climate science

How can climate policy be made more just and fair? IIASA researchers have synthesized different dimensions of justice into a framework that can be used by climate scientists and policymakers, explaining how previous research ...

How can we evaluate the quality of global water models?

A new international study has tested the extent to which global water models agree with one another and with observational data. Using a new evaluation approach, the research team, which includes IIASA researchers, can show ...

Using satellite data to enhance global food security

Accurate estimates and forecasts of crop area and yield play an important role in guiding policy decisions related to food security, especially in light of the growing impacts of climate change. IIASA researchers and colleagues ...

Challenges ahead: Navigating climate change and water management

Water availability is limited, and several socio-economic sectors compete for the available water resources. Consequently, water withdrawals often take place at the expense of environmental flows, leading to loss of biodiversity ...

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