Finding coronavirus's helper proteins

A group of scientists led by EMBL's Mikhail Savitski, Nassos Typas, and Pedro Beltrao, and collaborator Steeve Boulant at Heidelberg University Hospital, have analyzed how the novel coronavirus affects proteins in human cells. ...

At the core of the integrator complex

Gene expression is a highly regulated process that involves several steps. These include transcription of DNA instructions into RNA, removal of non-coding segments from the RNA message, and its subsequent translation into ...

Toadlet peptide transforms into a deadly weapon against bacteria

Researchers at the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology and EMBL Hamburg have discovered remarkable molecular properties of an antimicrobial peptide from the skin of the Australian toadlet. The discovery could inspire ...

Heating proteins to understand how genes work

Understanding how genes work and how they interact with one another is a major goal of biology. This poses huge challenges in terms of both methods and the sheer numbers of experiments required. Recent advances have transformed ...

Replication cycle of SARS-CoV-2 in 3-D

As the global coronavirus pandemic continues, scientists are not only trying to find vaccines and drugs to combat it, but also to continuously learn more about the virus itself. "By now we can expect the coronavirus to become ...

How deadly parasites 'glide' into human cells

In biological terms, gliding refers to the type of movement during which a cell moves along a surface without changing its shape. This form of movement is unique to parasites from the phylum Apicomplexa, such as Plasmodium ...

How to remove unwanted components from the cell nucleus

The organization of cells into specific compartments is critical for their function. For instance, by separating the nucleus from the cytoplasm, the nuclear envelope prevents premature translation of immature RNAs.

Eat more to grow more arms… if you're a sea anemone

Your genetic code determines that you will grow two arms and two legs. The same fate is true for all mammals. Similarly, the number of fins a fish has and the number of legs and wings an insect has are embedded in their genetic ...

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