Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, (CSHL) traces its roots to 1890. It is presently located in Suffolk County, Long Island, New York. The private, not for profit lab scientists from the Carnegie Institution of Department of Genetics have made significant contributions in the study and treatment of genetics and medicine. Recently, The Watson School of Biological Sciences was established which employs 400 scientists. CSHL has an educational and research component. CSHL has eight Nobel Laureates who have been associated with the lab. Many break-through discoveries have been made at CSHL. Among the discoveries is the work by John D. Watson who co-discovered the double helix structure of DNA with Francis Crick. Robert J. Roberts received the Nobel Prize for the co-discovery of introns and RNA splicing. CSHL requires all inquiries from the media and public go through Mr. Tarr, e-mail provided.

Address
One Bungtown Road Cold Spring Harbor, NY 11724 516-367-8800
Website
http://www.cshl.edu/index.html
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cold_Spring_Harbor_Laboratory

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ENCODE3: Interpreting the human and mouse genomes

Scientists around the world have access to a rich trove of information through the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE)—annotated versions of the human and mouse genomes that are vital for interpreting their genetic codes. ...

Brain receptor pulls open electrical gate like a puppet master

For the first time, researchers in the lab of CSHL Professor Hiro Furukawa have been able to track each atom in the NMDA receptor, an important brain protein, as it transmits or inhibits neural signals. Critical for brain ...

How to tune out common odors and focus on important ones

Quantitative biologists at CSHL have figured out how a fly brain learns to ignore overwhelmingly prevalent, mundane odors to focus on more important ones. It's an important step towards understanding how our senses work and ...

Predicting the evolution of genetic mutations

Quantitative biologists David McCandlish and Juannan Zhou at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory have developed an algorithm with predictive power, giving scientists the ability to see how specific genetic mutations can combine ...

Images of 'invisible' holes on cells may jumpstart research

High blood pressure, inflammation, and the sensation of pain may rely in part on tiny holes on the surface of cells, called pores. Living cells react to the environment, often by allowing water and other molecules to pass ...

New look at odd holes involved in taste, Alzheimer's, asthma

Many cells are covered with mysterious large holes, pores that have been associated with the sense of taste as well as Alzheimer's disease, depression, and even asthma. Knowing the structure of these varied holes will help ...

Finally, machine learning interprets gene regulation clearly

In this age of "big data," artificial intelligence (AI) has become a valuable ally for scientists. Machine learning algorithms, for instance, are helping biologists make sense of the dizzying number of molecular signals that ...

A new tomato ideal for urban gardens and even outer space

Farmers could soon be growing tomatoes bunched like grapes in a storage unit, on the roof of a skyscraper, or even in space. That's if a clutch of new gene-edited crops prove as fruitful as the first batch.

Shifting the balance of growth vs. defense boosts crop yield

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) scientists are figuring out how to pack more kernels onto a corn cob. One way to boost the productivity of a plant, they say, is to redirect some of its resources away from maintaining ...

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