Argonne National Laboratory is the first and the largest national labs chartered in 1946 in DuPage County, Illinois. The US Department of Energy funds Argonne National Lab and U Chicago Argonne, LLC manages the site. Argonne National Lab is the descendant of Chicago's Metallurgical Laboratory and the home of Enrico Fermi's first controlled nuclear chain reaction demonstration. Today the Argonne Laboratory consists of the Argonne Advanced Photon Source, The Argonne Tandem Linear Accelerator System and conducts basic scientific research, conducts experiments on clean energy sources, manages environmental problems nationally, and most importantly reviews and monitors national security risks.

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Communications & Public Affairs Argonne National Laboratory 9700 S. Cass Avenue Argonne, IL 60439
Website
http://www.anl.gov/index.html
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Argonne_National_Laboratory

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Giving ATLAS a boost

The outer realms of the periodic table, where stable, long-lived isotopes give way to radioactive ions, offer nuclear scientists a unique glimpse into the structure of nuclei and a better understanding of how the different ...

Six degrees of nuclear separation

Argonne scientists look to 3-D printing to ease separation anxiety, which paves the way to recycle more nuclear material.

Shaping nanoparticles for improved quantum information technology

Particles that are mere nanometers in size are at the forefront of scientific research today. They come in many different shapes: rods, spheres, cubes, vesicles, S-shaped worms and even donut-like rings. What makes them worthy ...

AI technique does double duty spanning cosmic and subatomic scales

While high-energy physics and cosmology seem worlds apart in terms of sheer scale, physicists and cosmologists at Argonne are using similar machine learning methods to address classification problems for both subatomic particles ...

Shocking heat waves stabilize single atoms

Single atoms work great as catalysts, but they usually don't stay single for long. Argonne scientists are part of a team that uses high-temperature shock waves to keep them in their place.

Getting a look under the hood of topological insulators

Certain materials, like copper, conduct electricity very well. Other materials, like glass, do not. A certain kind of material, called a topological insulator, acts partially like one and partially like the other ― it ...

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