American Ornithological Society

The American Ornithological Society (AOS) is an ornithological organization based in the United States. The society was formed in October 2016 by the merger of the American Ornithologists' Union (AOU) and the Cooper Ornithological Society. Its members are primarily professional ornithologists although membership is open to anyone with an interest in birds. The AOS is a member of the Ornithological Council and Ornithological Societies of North America (OSNA). The society publishes the two scholarly journals The Auk and The Condor as well as the AOS Checklist of North American Birds.

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Getting to the root of long-term tree swallow declines

Aerial insectivores—birds that hunt for insect prey on the wing—are declining across North America. Conserving vulnerable species such as these requires a good understanding of the factors impacting them at every stage ...

dateOct 17, 2018 in Ecology
shares1 comments 0

Newly identified African bird species already in trouble

Central Africa's Albertine Rift region is a biodiversity hotspot consisting of a system of highlands that spans six countries. Recent studies have shown that the population of sooty bush-shrikes occupying the region's mid-elevation ...

dateSep 19, 2018 in Ecology
shares6 comments 0

Improving 'silvopastures' for bird conservation

The adoption of "silvopastures"—incorporating trees into pastureland—can provide habitat for forest bird species and improve connectivity in landscapes fragmented by agriculture. But how do silvopastures measure up to ...

dateSep 19, 2018 in Ecology
shares2 comments 0

A better way to count boreal birds

Knowing approximately how many individuals of a certain species are out there is important for bird conservation efforts, but raw data from bird surveys tends to underestimate bird abundance. The researchers behind a new ...

dateAug 29, 2018 in Ecology
shares5 comments 0

Woodpeckers and development coexist in Seattle

The two largest woodpeckers in North America, the Imperial Woodpecker and Ivory-billed Woodpecker, are believed to have gone extinct during the twentieth century. Can their surviving cousin, the Pileated Woodpecker, persist ...

dateAug 22, 2018 in Ecology
shares8 comments 0

Arctic seabird populations respond to climate change

Seabirds such as gulls can be key indicators of environmental change as their populations respond to shifts in their ocean habitat over time. A new study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances investigates how several species ...

dateAug 15, 2018 in Ecology
shares54 comments 0