'Live fast, die young' lifestyle reflected in birds' feathers

Animals' lives tend to follow a quicker tempo as they get farther from the equator—birds at more northern latitudes mature faster, start reproducing younger, and live shorter lives, probably as a way of dealing with seasonal ...

How does agriculture affect vulnerable insect-eating birds?

Aerial insectivores—birds that hunt for insect prey on the wing—are declining across North America as agricultural intensification leads to diminishing insect abundance and diversity in many areas. A new study from The ...

A better way to count boreal birds

Knowing approximately how many individuals of a certain species are out there is important for bird conservation efforts, but raw data from bird surveys tends to underestimate bird abundance. The researchers behind a new ...

Woodpeckers and development coexist in Seattle

The two largest woodpeckers in North America, the Imperial Woodpecker and Ivory-billed Woodpecker, are believed to have gone extinct during the twentieth century. Can their surviving cousin, the Pileated Woodpecker, persist ...

Arctic seabird populations respond to climate change

Seabirds such as gulls can be key indicators of environmental change as their populations respond to shifts in their ocean habitat over time. A new study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances investigates how several species ...

Where do crows go in winter?

"Partial migration"—where some individuals within a population migrate and some don't—is common among birds and is speculated to be a step on the evolutionary path to complete, long-distance migration, but scientists ...

Newly discovered crossbill species numbers few

As might be expected for a recently discovered bird species in the continental United States—only the second in nearly 80 years—the Cassia Crossbill (Loxia sinesciuris) is range-restricted. It occurs in just two small ...

Mapping endangered red knots' remote breeding habitat

The rufa subspecies of Red Knot travels from its breeding grounds in the Canadian Arctic to its winter habitat in South America and back each year, an incredible 15,000 kilometers each way. Its numbers have fallen precipitously ...

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