Computer Sciences

A technique to estimate emotional valence and arousal by analyzing images of human faces

In recent years, countless computer scientists worldwide have been developing deep neural network-based models that can predict people's emotions based on their facial expressions. Most of the models developed so far, however, ...

Astronomy

Extreme black holes have hair that can be combed

Black holes are considered amongst the most mysterious objects in the universe. Part of their intrigue arises from the fact that they are actually among the simplest solutions to Einstein's field equations of general relativity. ...

Researchers develop biodegradable printed display

In the next years, increasing use of electronic devices in consumables and new technologies for the internet of things will increase the amount of electronic scrap. To save resources and minimize waste volumes, an eco-friendlier ...

Metamaterial tiles boost sensitivity of large telescopes

A multi-institutional group of researchers has developed new metamaterial tiles that will help improve the sensitivity of telescopes being built at the preeminent Simons Observatory in Chile. The tiles have been incorporated ...

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Medical Xpress

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes
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Tech Xplore

LSD may offer viable treatment for certain mental disorders

Researchers from McGill University have discovered, for the first time, one of the possible mechanisms that contributes to the ability of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) to increase social interaction. The findings, which ...

A benchmark for single-electron circuits

Manipulating individual electrons with the goal of employing quantum effects offers new possibilities and greater precision in electronics. However, these single-electron circuits are governed by the laws of quantum mechanics, ...

Building a corn cob—cell by cell, gene by gene

Corn hasn't always been the sweet, juicy delight that we know today. And, without adapting to a rapidly changing climate, it is at risk of losing its place as a food staple. Putting together a plant is a genetic puzzle, with ...

Cell 'bones' mystery solved with supercomputers

Our cells are filled with 'bones,' in a sense. Thin, flexible protein strands called actin filaments help support and move around the bulk of the cells of eukaryotes, which includes all plants and animals. Always on the go, ...

Solar hydrogen: Photoanodes promise high efficiencies

Photoanodes made of metal oxides are considered to be a viable solution for the production of hydrogen with sunlight. α-SnWO4 has optimal electronic properties for photoelectrochemical water splitting with sunlight, but ...

Reef fish futures foretold

An international group of scientists is predicting markedly different outcomes for different species of coral reef fishes under climate change—and have made substantial progress on picking the 'winners and losers'.

Fighting racial inequity by funding Black scientists

Representatives from a network of women deans, chairs and distinguished faculty in biomedical engineering are calling upon the National Institutes of Health and other funding agencies to address disparities in allocating ...

Can dogs rapidly learn words?

A new study shows that talented dogs can learn new words after hearing them only four times. While preliminary evidence seems to show that most dogs do not learn words (i.e., names of objects), unless very extensively trained, ...

Myeloid immune cells in the blood tied to severe COVID-19

Individual variations in how the immune system responds to SARS-CoV-2 appear to impact the severity of disease. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have now been able to show that patients with severe COVID-19 ...

Wirelessly rechargeable soft brain implant controls brain cells

A group of KAIST researchers and collaborators have engineered a tiny brain implant that can be wirelessly recharged from outside the body to control brain circuits for long periods of time without battery replacement. The ...

At three days old, newborn mice remember their moms

For mice, the earliest social memories can form at three days old and last into adulthood, scientists report on January 26 in the journal Cell Reports. They show that mouse pups prefer their mothers to unfamiliar mouse mothers ...

Neonatal antibiotic use associated with reduced growth in boys

Exposure to antibiotics in the first days of life is thought to affect physiological aspects of neonatal development. A new study, led by Bar-Ilan University's Azrieli Faculty of Medicine, reveals that antibiotic treatment ...

In search of stable liquids

Most liquids are in suspension. Particles too small to see by naked eye swirl everywhere as gravity and temperature changes move them around. Keeping liquids from separating can be a hassle for the foods we buy in the supermarket, ...

People follow a crowd, no matter its politics

Amid the clamor of political polarization and mistrust, new Cornell Tech research has found cause for optimism: When it comes to evaluating news, people tend to trust the opinions of a large group whether it's composed of ...

The high cost of online attacks against women

When Parkland, Fla., high school student Emma Gonzalez spoke forcefully against gun violence in 2018 after the mass shooting at her high school, the video of her plea went viral. She received acclaim and hundreds of thousands ...

Mending the hearts of a beloved dog breed

Suzanne Cunningham, a veterinary cardiologist and associate professor at Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, loves boxer dogs, but they've been breaking her heart since she was a child.

How to set ambitious goals for sustainable agriculture

Food production in the Netherlands is an economic success but has led to many environmental issues, including nitrogen pollution. Recently, the policy to allow economic growth while reducing nitrogen losses was disapproved ...

Why COVID-19 won't kill cities

For those of you who live in cities, ask yourself: What it is about your urban lifestyle that makes it worth it despite the pollution, the noise and the traffic? Perhaps it's the hundreds of unique restaurants that you like ...

New species of custard apple family found in Myanmar

With over 100 species, Artabotrys is a large palaeotropical genus that belongs to the custard apple family (Annonacea), one of the most diverse and primitive families of the angiosperms. In Myanmar, the genus is represented ...