Frenchman trying to cross Atlantic in barrel capsule

December 27, 2018
Frenchman trying to cross Atlantic in barrel capsule
In this photograph taken Saturday Dec. 22, 2018, Frenchman Jean-Jacques Savin, 71-year-old, stands on top of his 3-metre (10-foot) long, 2.1-metre (7-foot) wide resin-coated plywood capsule, which will use ocean currents alone to propel him across the sea. Savin set off from El Hierro in Spain's Canary Islands on Wednesday and is aiming to complete his 4,500-kilometre (2,800-mile) journey to the Caribbean in about three months. (Courtesy of Jean-Jacques Savin via AP)

A 71-year-old Frenchman has departed on a journey across the Atlantic in a specially constructed barrel capsule, designed to use ocean currents alone to propel him across the sea.

Jean-Jacques Savin set off from El Hierro in Spain's Canary Islands on Wednesday and is aiming to complete his 4,500-kilometre (2,800-mile) journey to the Caribbean in about three months.

Savin will drop markers from his three-meter (10-foot) long, 2.1-metre (seven-foot) wide resin-coated plywood capsule along the trip to assist oceanographers in their study of currents in the Atlantic Ocean.

The barrel is equipped with a kitchen area, and a mattress with straps to keep him from being thrown about by rough seas.

Frenchman trying to cross Atlantic in barrel capsule
In this photograph taken Saturday Dec. 22, 2018, Frenchman Jean-Jacques Savin, 71-year-old, stands ontop of his 3-metre (10-foot) long, 2.1-metre (7-foot) wide resin-coated plywood capsule, which will use ocean currents alone to propel him across the sea. Savin set off from El Hierro in Spain's Canary Islands on Wednesday and is aiming to complete his 4,500-kilometre (2,800-mile) journey to the Caribbean in about three months. (Courtesy of Jean-Jacques Savin via AP)
In this photograph taken Saturday Dec. 22, 2018, Frenchman Jean-Jacques Savin, 71-year-old, stands ontop of his 3-metre (10-foot) long, 2.1-metre (7-foot) wide resin-coated plywood capsule, which will use ocean currents alone to propel him across the sea. Savin set off from El Hierro in Spain's Canary Islands on Wednesday and is aiming to complete his 4,500-kilometre (2,800-mile) journey to the Caribbean in about three months. (Courtesy of Jean-Jacques Savin via AP)
Frenchman trying to cross Atlantic in barrel capsule
In this photograph taken Saturday Dec. 22, 2018, Frenchman Jean-Jacques Savin, 71-year-old, left, unloads his 3-metre (10-foot) long, 2.1-metre (7-foot) wide resin-coated plywood capsule, which will use ocean currents alone to propel him across the sea. Savin set off from El Hierro in Spain's Canary Islands on Wednesday and is aiming to complete his 4,500-kilometre (2,800-mile) journey to the Caribbean in about three months. (Courtesy of Jean-Jacques Savin via AP)

Explore further: 129I waste used to track ocean currents for 15,000 km after discharge from nuclear plants

Related Stories

Forecasting ocean 'weather'

September 7, 2016

Checking the daily weather forecast is something most of us do out of habit. Now, fishermen, offshore oil workers and even surfers can do the same with the Atlantic's "ocean weather," thanks to a model prediction tool created ...

Solar plane powers on over Atlantic after turbulence

June 22, 2016

The Solar Impulse 2 plane went through "a long night of turbulence" over the Atlantic, its weary pilot said Wednesday as he continued on the challenging leg of its sun-powered trip around the world.

Recommended for you

The pace at which the world's permafrost soils are warming

January 16, 2019

Global warming is causing increasing damage in the world's permafrost regions. As the new global comparative study conducted by the international permafrost network GTN-P shows, in all regions with permafrost soils the temperature ...

Sewers could help clean the atmosphere

January 16, 2019

Sewage treatment—an unglamorous backbone of urban living—could offer a cost-effective way to combat climate change by flushing greenhouse gases from the atmosphere.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.