Russia reports computer bug on International Space Station

November 6, 2018
ISS. Credit: NASA

Russia's space agency says that one of the International Space Station's computers has malfunctioned, but the glitch doesn't pose any risks to the crew.

Roscosmos said Tuesday that one of three computers in the station's Russian module has failed. It said Russian flight controllers plan to reboot it Thursday.

The agency emphasized that the computer problem wouldn't affect the station's crew—NASA's Serena Aunon-Chancellor, Russian Sergei Prokopyev and German Alexander Gerst. It said two other computers can maintain the station's operation.

The follows last month's aborted launch of a new station crew. NASA astronaut Nick Hague and Roscosmos cosmonaut Alexei Ovchinin landed safely after their Russian booster rocket failed two minutes into the Oct. 11 flight.

The next crew is set to be launched in early December.

Explore further: Russian rocket puts satellite into orbit, 1st since failure

Related Stories

Russia blames rocket failure on technical malfunction

October 31, 2018

Russia's space agency said on Wednesday that an investigation has found that a rocket carrying a crew to the International Space Station failed three weeks ago because of a technical malfunction of a sensor.

Image: The space station transits the sun

October 11, 2018

This composite image, made from nine frames, shows the International Space Station, with a crew of three onboard, in silhouette as it transits the Sun at roughly five miles per second, Sunday, Oct. 7, 2018.

Recommended for you

Astronomers discover giant relic of disrupted Tadpole galaxy

November 19, 2018

A team of astronomers from Israel, the U.S. and Russia have identified a disrupted galaxy resembling a giant tadpole, complete with an elliptical head and a long, straight tail, about 300 million light years away from Earth. ...

A solar sibling identical to the sun

November 19, 2018

An international team led by Instituto de Astrofísica e Ciências do Espaço (IA) researcher Vardan Adibekyan used a novel method to detect solar siblings. The article was published in the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics.

Exploding stars make key ingredient in sand, glass

November 19, 2018

We are all, quite literally, made of star dust. Many of the chemicals that compose our planet and our bodies were formed directly by stars. Now, a new study using observations by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope reports for ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.