Roman rooftops all abuzz for air pollution study

July 27, 2018
Italian beekeepers are spreading their wings into the study of pollution in Rome, working with the country's carabinieri military police to learn more about the state of the air in the Eternal City

Italian beekeepers are spreading their wings into the study of pollution in Rome, working with the country's carabinieri military police to learn more about the state of the air in the Eternal City.

On the roof of a building in the heart of the capital that houses the Italian Federation of Beekeepers (FAI), 15 beehives are abuzz with activity.

"This is an experimental urban hive that we are using to collect data of scientific interest, in order for example to devise a plant biodiversity map of Rome," FAI president Raffaele Cirone told AFP.

"However we are also studying the of being in the centre of a big city," added Cirone, who is looking for the harmful residue of fine particles PM10 and PM2.5, heavy metals and micro-plastics.

Instruments measuring the number of in the air are placed a few steps away from the rooftop hives.

Data taken from the instruments will be compared with the honey produced in the hives, which is periodically removed and analysed by the scientists.

"The scientists will be able to better understand the movements of these particles, if and how much they rise from the ground and whether they settle," Cirone said.

In total around a dozen roofs in the centre of Rome house the hives, including one at the top of a carabinieri building.

Bees are helping researchers study the adverse effects of being in the centre of a big city
Bees are helping researchers study the adverse effects of being in the centre of a big city

The aim is to move towards a larger colony of high rise helpers, Davide De Laurentis, deputy Commander of the force's forestry, environmental and agri-food unit, told AFP.

De Laurentis, who describes bees as "nature's sentinels", says that the initiative could be rolled out in other major Italian major cities that suffer from problems with pollution.

On the roof of a building in the heart of the capital that houses the Italian Federation of Beekeepers (FAI), 15 beehives are abuzz with activity

Data taken from the instruments will be compared with the honey produced in the hives, which is periodically removed and analysed by the scientists

Explore further: Bee rescue mounted after hospital breaks out in hives

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