Space station research explorer on NASA.gov launches phase one

December 15, 2017 by Jenny Howard, NASA
The Heart Cells investigation uses human skin cells that are induced to become stem cells, which can then differentiate into any type of cell. Researchers forced the stem cells to grow into human heart cells, which NASA astronaut Kate Rubins cultured aboard the space station for one month. Credit: NASA

Researchers, prospective partners, media professionals, students, and space enthusiasts now have more space station science at their fingertips with Space Station Research Explorer on NASA.gov (SSRE on NASA.gov). The new information exploration tool enables researchers, practiced and amateur alike, to stay up-to-date with the science being conducted aboard the International Space Station.

With just a few clicks, users are granted access to thousands of investigations, results summaries, article citations and in-orbit photographs. Designed with ease of use in mind, investigations can be browsed by keyword, expedition, scientific category, publication, international partner, organization or developer.

SSRE on NASA.gov will release in two phases. The current phase of the database features an improved search capability and creates an exclusive environment for space science. While information about scientific investigations aboard the station have always been searchable on the main NASA.gov webpage, SSRE on NASA.gov now creates a more tailored experience for the scientifically curious by allowing the research to be accessed through one search field.

Phase one also features a more modernized, sleek look with the ability to share findings on social media, to easily cite investigations or articles and to bookmark favorite investigations or facilities for later use.

Phase two will include smaller, user-satisfaction features based on metrics collected during the initial roll-out of the science database, including more robust search capabilities and more polished user interfaces.

SSRE provides a one-stop-shop for all of the scientific investigations that have occurred aboard the International Space Station. Credit: NASA

Explore further: U.S. cargo ship set to depart from International Space Station

Related Stories

U.S. cargo ship set to depart from International Space Station

September 12, 2017

After delivering more than 6,400 pounds of cargo, a SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft will depart the International Space Station on Sunday, Sept. 17. NASA Television and the agency's website will provide live coverage of Dragon's ...

Image: Reflecting on a spacecraft arrival

April 23, 2015

Cargo has arrived at the International Space Station to support approximately 40 of the more than 250 science and research investigations that will be performed during Expeditions 43 and 44, including numerous human research ...

Image: Antares Rocket Raising

October 17, 2016

The Orbital ATK Antares rocket, with the Cygnus spacecraft onboard, is raised into the vertical position on launch Pad-0A, Friday, Oct. 14, 2016, at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia.

Recommended for you

Neutron-star merger yields new puzzle for astrophysicists

January 18, 2018

The afterglow from the distant neutron-star merger detected last August has continued to brighten - much to the surprise of astrophysicists studying the aftermath of the massive collision that took place about 138 million ...

Meteoritic stardust unlocks timing of supernova dust formation

January 18, 2018

Dust is everywhere—not just in your attic or under your bed, but also in outer space. To astronomers, dust can be a nuisance by blocking the light of distant stars, or it can be a tool to study the history of our universe, ...

New technique for finding life on Mars

January 18, 2018

Researchers demonstrate for the first time the potential of existing technology to directly detect and characterize life on Mars and other planets. The study, published in Frontiers in Microbiology, used miniaturized scientific ...

North, east, south, west: The many faces of Abell 1758

January 18, 2018

Resembling a swarm of flickering fireflies, this beautiful galaxy cluster glows intensely in the dark cosmos, accompanied by the myriad bright lights of foreground stars and swirling spiral galaxies. A1758N is a sub-cluster ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.