Space station research explorer on NASA.gov launches phase one

December 15, 2017 by Jenny Howard, NASA
The Heart Cells investigation uses human skin cells that are induced to become stem cells, which can then differentiate into any type of cell. Researchers forced the stem cells to grow into human heart cells, which NASA astronaut Kate Rubins cultured aboard the space station for one month. Credit: NASA

Researchers, prospective partners, media professionals, students, and space enthusiasts now have more space station science at their fingertips with Space Station Research Explorer on NASA.gov (SSRE on NASA.gov). The new information exploration tool enables researchers, practiced and amateur alike, to stay up-to-date with the science being conducted aboard the International Space Station.

With just a few clicks, users are granted access to thousands of investigations, results summaries, article citations and in-orbit photographs. Designed with ease of use in mind, investigations can be browsed by keyword, expedition, scientific category, publication, international partner, organization or developer.

SSRE on NASA.gov will release in two phases. The current phase of the database features an improved search capability and creates an exclusive environment for space science. While information about scientific investigations aboard the station have always been searchable on the main NASA.gov webpage, SSRE on NASA.gov now creates a more tailored experience for the scientifically curious by allowing the research to be accessed through one search field.

Phase one also features a more modernized, sleek look with the ability to share findings on social media, to easily cite investigations or articles and to bookmark favorite investigations or facilities for later use.

Phase two will include smaller, user-satisfaction features based on metrics collected during the initial roll-out of the science database, including more robust search capabilities and more polished user interfaces.

SSRE provides a one-stop-shop for all of the scientific investigations that have occurred aboard the International Space Station. Credit: NASA

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