Nobel Laureates say change is coming for women in sciences

December 7, 2017
Nobel Laureates say change is coming for women in sciences
From left, Richard Henderson, Nobel Laureate in Chemistry, Joachim Frank, Nobel Laureate in Chemistry, Jacques Dubochet, Nobel Laureate in Chemistry, Kip Thorne, Nobel Laureate in Physics and Barry Barish, Nobel Laureate in Physics speak during a press conference at the Royal Academy of Science in Stockholm, Thursday Dec. 7, 2017. (Pontus Lundahl/TT News Agency via AP)

A group of 2017 Nobel Laureates have addressed the lack of female representation in sciences ahead of the prize-awarding ceremony in Stockholm.

The seven winners of this year's Nobel Prize in Physics, Chemistry and Economic Sciences—all white men—said change is happening.

Jacques Dubochet, who won the chemistry prize, told reporters: "Science has been made by males, for . It is changing, it takes time, but you will see it, they (women in science) are coming."

Physicist Kip Thorne pointed to the increase in the number of women entering undergraduate programs in sciences today compared to when he was a student.

He said Thursday: "Change is coming, but there is a long delay between entering freshman and the Nobel prize."

Nobel Laureates say change is coming for women in sciences
Nobel Laureates in Physics 2017 from left, Barry Barish, Kip Thorne and Rainer Weiss at the Royal Academy of Science in Stockholm, Thursday Dec. 7, 2017. (Pontus Lundahl/TT via AP)

Nobel Laureates say change is coming for women in sciences
From left, Richard Thaler, Nobel Laureate in Economics, speaks during a press conference with Richard Henderson, Nobel Laureate in Chemistry, Joachim Frank, Nobel Laureate in Chemistry and Jacques Dubochet, Nobel Laureate in Chemistry at the Royal Academy of Science in Stockholm, Thursday Dec. 7, 2017. (Pontus Lundahl/TT via AP)

Explore further: Video: The 2017 Nobel Prize in Chemistry: Cryo-electron microscopy explained

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