NASA using asteroid's close flyby to test warning network

October 11, 2017 by Marcia Dunn
NASA using asteroid's close flyby to test warning network
This image released by the European Southern Observatory on Aug. 10, 2017 shows near Earth asteroid 2012 TC4, the dot at center. The image was made from a composite of 37 individual 50-second exposures, and the background stars and galaxies appear as bright trails. NASA is using the asteroid's close flyby to test Earth's warning network for incoming space rocks. The asteroid will pass within about 27,000 miles (43,000 kilometers) of Antarctica early Thursday, Oct. 11, 2017. (Olivier Hainaut (ESO), Marco Micheli (ESA), Detlef Koschny (ESA)/ESO/ESA NEOCC via AP)

NASA is using an asteroid's close flyby to test Earth's warning network for incoming space rocks.

The small asteroid was on track to pass within 27,200 miles (43,800 kilometers) of Antarctica early Thursday.

Program scientist Michael Kelley said that's "pretty close" as these things go. But he stressed there's no chance it will hit us. Future space rocks might, though—thus this first-of-its-kind cosmic fire drill.

"You never expect your office building to catch fire and to be trapped in there, but you have fire drills anyway," he said Wednesday. "That's what I've been using as kind of an analogy to what we're doing here."

Observatories worldwide—part of the International Asteroid Warning Network—have been zooming in on the asteroid called 2012 TC4 for weeks to test communication and coordination. Kelley said it's gone well.

Until now, researchers relied on "tabletop" tests, simulations with no actual asteroids involved. The exercise will continue for another week, as observatories keep tracking the asteroid as it departs Earth's neighborhood.

First spotted in 2012 and then disappearing from view until this past July, the asteroid is estimated to measure 45 feet to 100 feet (14 to 30 meters.). Kelley said astronomers should have a better handle on the shape and size of the rock—which they believe is oblong, like a potato—in coming days and weeks, as more observations pour in.

Scientists picked this particular asteroid because they knew it did not threaten Earth, yet had some uncertainty in its path. That uncertainty is what provided the challenge for observers, all volunteers in this project. They are using major telescopes in Hawaii and Arizona, among other places. Puerto Rico's Arecibo Observatory got knocked out by last month's Hurricane Maria and could not take part.

Backyard astronomers have little chance of seeing the asteroid, according to Kelley, given its speed and faintness. It won't be visible with the naked eye. The closest approach: 1:40 a.m. EDT Thursday.

The communication lines for the test have extended all the way to the Federal Emergency Management Agency and even the White House, according to Kelley, who's leading the effort for NASA's Planetary Defense Coordination Office.

Another test—using another actual asteroid headed harmlessly our way—is planned in the next few years.

Explore further: Asteroid tracking network observes close approach

More information: NASA: www.nasa.gov/planetarydefense

Related Stories

Asteroid tracking network observes close approach

October 11, 2017

On Oct. 12 EDT (Oct. 11 PDT), a small asteroid designated 2012 TC4 will safely pass by Earth at a distance of approximately 26,000 miles (42,000 kilometers). This is a little over one tenth the distance to the moon and just ...

Asteroid Florence has two moons

September 6, 2017

Florence, an asteroid that came within 4.4 million miles (7.0 million kilometers) of Earth last week, has two small moons, according to radar images obtained by NASA.

Close approach of asteroid 2012 TC4 poses no danger to Earth

October 10, 2017

The house-sized asteroid 2012 TC4 is slated to give Earth a close shave on Thursday, October 12, swooshing by our planet at approximately 5:41 UTC (1:41 a.m. EDT) at a distance of about 31,000 miles (50,000 kilometers). Although ...

Largest asteroid in a century to whiz by Sept 1

August 30, 2017

The largest asteroid in more than a century will whiz safely past Earth on September 1 at a safe but unusually close distance of about 4.4 million miles (7 million kilometers), NASA said.

Recommended for you

How massive can neutron stars be?

January 16, 2018

Astrophysicists at Goethe University Frankfurt set a new limit for the maximum mass of neutron stars: They cannot exceed 2.16 solar masses.

Black hole spin cranks-up radio volume

January 12, 2018

Statistical analysis of supermassive black holes suggests that the spin of the black hole may play a role in the generation of powerful high-speed jets blasting radio waves and other radiation across the universe.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.