Billionaire gives $30M to Univ. of Arizona for Biosphere 2

September 21, 2017

Texas billionaire Edward P. Bass is giving $30 million to the University of Arizona to support the Biosphere 2 research facility.

Biosphere 2 Director Joaquin Ruiz says Bass' gift will allow continued research into global climate change and other "grand scientific challenges" affecting daily life.

The university has operated Biosphere 2 since 2007. Bass says he's confident the university's stewardship will benefit the planet's long-term well-being.

The university's announcement Wednesday says the gift is the third major commitment by a Bass foundation to support the university's research and operations at Biosphere 2.

Biosphere 2 was used in the early 1990s for research involving extended stays inside the facility.

It is in the small community of Oracle about 25 miles (40 kilometers) north of the university's campus in Tucson.

Explore further: Role of terrestrial biosphere in counteracting climate change may have been underestimated

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rderkis
1 / 5 (2) Sep 21, 2017
Yep, better than spending the money on fusion research, quantum computers, better batteries, electric cars, genetic research, stem cell research or some other technology that will actually benefit humanity in a big way.
ShotmanMaslo
5 / 5 (1) Sep 21, 2017
Closed ecosystems such as Biosphere are the very epitome of sustainable living and could certainly benefit humanity in a big way.
rderkis
not rated yet Sep 22, 2017
Closed ecosystems such as Biosphere are the very epitome of sustainable living and could certainly benefit humanity in a big way.


Ok, I will bite. Show us some breakthrough technologies that came out of biosphere 1 that are the equal or better then the ones I mentioned.
ShotmanMaslo
not rated yet Sep 22, 2017
Closed ecosystems such as Biosphere are the very epitome of sustainable living and could certainly benefit humanity in a big way.


Ok, I will bite. Show us some breakthrough technologies that came out of biosphere 1 that are the equal or better then the ones I mentioned.


Having the ability to seal yourself inside a settlement with no outside input other than energy and still survive almost indefinitely? Sounds pretty useful to me. Developing such tech could lead to many advances in sustainable living here on Earth and will probably be crucial for any space colonizaton efforts.

Anyway, you seem to think humanity is only capable of working on a single technology at the time and must pick up the best one... newsflash: we can multitask, lol
rderkis
1 / 5 (2) Sep 22, 2017
We have no time to multitask. We need those resources now to actually develop fusion reactors now so we can actually start changing the climate now. The reason I mentioned quantum computers is because with them we will make much faster progress in all areas of research using simulations. Don't get me wrong the biosphere is a great little experiment, whose time will come. With it we can learn to live on other planets. Just not now.

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